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HURRY UP AND WAIT

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HURRY UP AND WAIT means take some action quickly, only to be halted at the next step in the process. Have you ever been asked to drop everything to complete an urgent task and then found that it wasn't so urgent after all?  "We followed the 'hurry up and wait' philosophy, arriving several hours prior to our flight." The phrase holds quite a bit of accuracy for some circumstances. Rushing to get to the airport two hours before the flight departs only to be delayed two hours on the tarmac waiting for clearance from the tower.  "When we went to the airport for our vacation, we followed the hurry up and wait philosophy, arriving several hours prior to our flight." It also applies to anything that requires you to be on time but does not start for a good while. Being in a rush to make it to the airport in time to pick someone up, only to learn it's delayed 2 hours.  "I did 80 just to get to the doctor's office on time, and he did not even show up

EXCITING

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EXCITING means arousing excitement, a feeling or situation full of joy, exhilaration, or upheaval; creating or arousing uncontrolled emotion; stirring; stimulating, thrilling, etc. "It's one of the most exciting matches I've ever seen!" One thing about excitement — it sure isn't boring. An exciting movie is full of action, and an exciting idea makes you feel very enthusiastic. "Try to keep the content fresh and exciting to read." There are a few types of excitement, but they're all exciting — they get your attention. If you can't wait for your birthday, you're feeling a happy kind of excitement.  "This voyage was the most exciting adventure of their lives." If everyone in class is screaming and throwing things, the teacher might ask, "What's all the excitement about?" A dog that's jumping, barking, and running in circles when his owner comes home is feeling and causing a lot of excitement. "They've got top

SCARFS and SCARVES

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A SCARF is a length of fabric you wrap around your neck or drape across the shoulders of your coat in cold weather. If you choose to wear more than one, are they scarfs or scarves? "A standout was the brightly colored cotton scarves with whimsical patterns such as different varieties of bugs." SCARFS and SCARVES are both correct spellings of "scarf". "The shoppers piled carts with coats, scarves/scarfs and sweaters." SCARFS [skɑː(r)fs] is the older of the two forms, though it has fallen from prominence since the 20th century. "The women walked down the street with scarfs on their heads." SCARFS can also be the third person singular form of the verb "scarf". It is typically used in the phrasal verb "scarf down", which means to eat quickly and voraciously or stuff food into one's face. "Heather scarfs down her goulash too fast to enjoy it." It's probably a newly formed American variant of a little-used British

The historical present

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In linguistics and rhetoric, the historical present or historic present, is the employment of the present tense when narrating past events to make them sound as if they are happening now.  "It is a bright summer day in 1947. My father is trying to decide which of his eight children he will take with him to the county fair."  It is often used when a speaker or writer tries to parachute you into the midst of an unfolding story. "I’m nine years old, in bed, in the dark. The detail in the room is perfectly clear. I am lying on my back. I have a greeny-gold quilted eiderdown covering me."  It is commonly used for historical events as facts are listed as a summary and the present tense provides a sense of urgency. "1945: the war in Europe comes to an end." University professors or a TV show panelists might find themselves using the HP to keep listeners from peeling off.  "What Socrates is trying to do here is …" or "Montezuma uses human sacrifice

What is the difference between a TV series and a serial?

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What is the difference between a TV series and a serial? Is one merely a subset of the other? Perhaps the difference is largely semantic. Or maybe the lines have blurred a bit. "It is more than a regular drama serial or just a sitcom." "The drama series is produced by BBC Wales and will be transmitted next year." The terms are closely related; a serial list of items forms a series. However they are essentially only loosely related terms when applied to television. "Lisa Kudrow became famous for her role as Phoebe in the TV series Friends." TV SERIES is a TV show broken into episodes. Each episode is usually broadcast at a regular interval or released simultaneously on streaming services.  "Are you watching the television series on Britain's castles?" Each episode is usually self-contained, so you can start from any episode.  "Just watched that random episode of Friends and got totally hooked up."  A series often contains the same ch

Talking (p1)

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✔ a little bird(y) told me - told by a secret informant. - Wow! How did you find out I'd be here? - A little bird told me you were coming. ✔ an armchair critic - one who speaks critically on topics one actually knows little to nothing about. - My uncle is such an armchair critic about the classes I'm taking—the fact that he never went to college doesn't stop him from weighing in! ✔ like talking to a brick wall - being ignored.  - Talking to you when the TV is on is like talking to a brick wall. Hello, can you hear me? ✔ “spit it out!” - a saying used to urge someone to get to the point/confess something quickly. - Just spit it out already—do you want to go to the dance with me or not? ✔ the gift of gab - the gift of being able to speak with eloquence.  - Alexis really has the gift of gab, so she should be the one to address the potential investors. ✔ to be all mouth - to talk boastfully about something in order to try and impress someone without intending on acting on your

Strategy for Use of English

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➡ 1) Know your English well. Study hard then the exam is easier. However, we need a backup plan just in case...  ➡ 2) Treat the two or three paragraphs in the text individually or you will end up reading the text again and again which you don't have time for.  ➡ 3) Start reading (don't look at the options in part 1 yet). Rely on your instinct. When you are reading at a nice, normal speed, you might be surprised how the word just appears. Finish the paragraph.  ➡ 4) Check to see if your "instinctive predictions" have appeared in options A B C or D. If yes, then you are 99.9% right (always double check to make sure you instinct wasn't wrong) :))  ➡ 5) If you instinctively chose a word and it is not there, but an exact synonym is, then there is a very strong chance that the synonym is the right answer. (Again double check)  ➡ 6) So we come across a gap and we have no idea what the answer can be. Look at your options A B C and D and see if one of them happens to fit.